Why All Men and Women Should do Lateral Shoulder Raises

As a personal trainer at the Jersey Shore (Monmouth County) you can believe that I work with a lot of men and women who want to improve their physique and look good on the beach.  For men AND women, that means reducing some excess fat on the body and building up some lean muscle tissue.  One of the first places I start is with the upper body.  The shoulders really catch your attention on someone if they are shaped nicely.  For men- shoulders not only help fill out your t-shirts but they broaden your silhouette and give the appearance of a strong upper body.  For women, adding some lean muscle to your shoulder area actually helps shrink the appearance of your waist and lower body.

The lateral raise is a great exercise to build up the outer portion of the shoulder and give some more of that hour glass look.  For men, it will give you a broader silhouette and also helps with shoulders that slope downwards.

The Lateral Raise primarily works the lateral deltoid, which is the middle portion of the deltoid muscle. The anterior (front) deltoid, posterior (back) deltoid, and upper traps will activate as well.

How to Perform the Lateral Raise

  1. Stand with feet hip-width apart. Slightly bend hips and knees. Hold dumbbells at your sides with your palms facing in. Bend your elbows slightly.
  2. Holding your core tight, raise the dumbbells to your side until your upper arms are  shoulder height (do not exceed shoulder height).
  3. Lower the dumbbells to the starting position.

 

About Eddie:

Eddie is a sought out personal trainer in Monmouth County, NJ. His body building back ground mixed with his present day CrossFit training is what helps him create workouts that can taylor to any fitness level, any age, and any results-oriendted individual.  Eddie owners Ultimate Fitness, a 24 hour gym in Monmouth County and Ultimate Fit Zone, a cross training and boot camp gym in Monmouth County as well. He is the director of training at both gyms.

Best Shoulder Workouts – Push Press vs Strict Shoulder Press

The strict shoulder press is a great mass builder for the posterior or front deltoid. This movement also involves the tricep and upper pectoral. Starting position is in the rack position with your hand approximately a thumb’s distance outside your hips. Rack position is when the bar is resting on the front deltoid under your chin along your clavicle with elbows pointed out and away from you. Elbows should be as high as you can get them. Your shoulders and hips should be in perfect alignment. To start off the movement, first you drop your elbows down and pull your chin back simultaneously so you can drive the bar directly upward. Then return to the rack position to complete the movement.

Strict Shoulder Press

strict-shoulder-press

 The Push Press is similar to the strict press. The hand spacing is the same and the starting rack position is identical. The only difference between the two is that the push press teaches you to use the energy from your hips to generate the beginning of the movement. This will benefit coordination and timing because you have to start the movement from the hip thrust (bend your knees slightly) to get the weight moving and then transfer the energy upward to the arms which finishes the movement to the lockout position.

Push Press

push-press

The Difference Between the Strict and Push Press

The strict press is more to build muscle and strength in the shoulders in a more controlled manner.

The Push Press has a combination of benefits. It helps raw strength along with timing and coordination because you’re able lift more weight and the sequence of hip to shoulder transfer of power have to be closely passed from the start of the movement to the finish.

About Eddie:

Eddie Albert is the owner of Ultimate Fitness in Ocean, NJ, a 24 hour gym where he is also the director of personal training. He is a former body builder and won the Mr New Jersey title in 1992. For more information, use the contact form below.

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